The EuroMillions Jackpot Cap

The EuroMillions jackpot cap currently stands at €230 million, the largest amount possible to win in the game.

EuroMillions Jackpot Cap Explained

If the jackpot reaches the €230 million cap, all funds from ticket sales that would have pushed the top prize higher are rolled down into the next winning tier. The jackpot can roll over four more times, but if there is still no jackpot winner in the final draw - the fifth successive draw when the jackpot is €230 million - the full amount is split between the winners in the next tier. This potentially means that a number of multimillionaires can be made in a single draw.

The €230 Million Jackpot Cap has been reached

The EuroMillions jackpot has reached it's all-time record of €230 million following a rollover in the previous draw. This means that players across the continent will be trying to land the biggest ever EuroMillions jackpot on Tuesday 26th!

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What happens next?

Now that the jackpot has reached its limit, it can remain at this level for a maximum of four draws, before it 'Must Be Won' in the fifth and final draw.

Any excess funds that would normally increase the jackpot while it remains at the cap will be filtered down to the next winning prize tier, meaning you can potentially win far bigger prizes for matching fewer numbers!

If there are no Tier 1 jackpot winners in the final draw, the entire jackpot will roll down to the next winning tier. Take a look at how the next few draws will work, if nobody lands the jackpot:

Jump to: Rolldown Draws | Previous Capped Draws | History
Jackpot Cap Infographic
Draw Before Cap

The jackpot rolls over and increases by €15 million from the previous draw to reach €220 million. The cap has not yet been reached.

The total prize fund for all winners matching 5 numbers + 1 lucky star remains at a typical average of €2.1 million.

The jackpot can roll over to the next draw and can still increase.

1st Capped Draw

The jackpot rolls over again and increased by €15 million but is capped at €230 million.

This creates an excess of €5 million, which is added to the Match 5 + 1 fund for a total of €7.1 million.

The jackpot can still roll over for four more draws, but it cannot increase in value.

5th Capped Draw

The jackpot rolls over again but remains capped at €220 million.

The €15 million excess that would have been added to the jackpot is added to the Match 5 + 1 prize fund of €2.1 million, which becomes €17.1 million.

The jackpot cannot roll over again. If there are no jackpot winners, the entire amount is added to the next winning tier.

Future Jackpot Caps

EuroMillions rules also allow for the jackpot cap to increase in future. As soon as a €230 million jackpot is won or has rolled down, the cap will become €240 million. The cap will continue to go up by €10 million after every time it has reached its limit and been won. The maximum jackpot cap is €250 million, so it will remain at this value even after it has been won.

Previous Cap:
Previous Cap:
Current Cap:
Next Cap:
Future Cap:
Please Note: Values and amounts in the above graphic are for guidance only and may not reflect actual draws.

Rolldowns and Must Be Won Draws

If the jackpot rolls over four more times after it hits the jackpot cap, a Must Be Won draw will take place. In Must Be Won draws the entire jackpot prize is guaranteed to be given away, even if no one matches all the numbers in the winning line. The below steps describe how the jackpot is awarded in Must Be Won draws:

To date, only three Must Be Won draws have occurred in EuroMillions. The most recent was on 8th October 2019, after the jackpot went 22 draws without a winner and remained at its jackpot cap for five successive draws. The first ever Must Be Won draw took place on 3rd February 2006 after a run of 11 consecutive rollovers, and that was closely followed by another Must Be Won draw on 17th November 2006.

Jackpot Cap Increase

Once the jackpot has reached €230 million and been won or rolled down, the cap will increase by €10 million. The next time it grows, it can therefore reach a maximum of €240 million before it is locked in place until there is a winner or a Must Be Won draw takes place. The cap will continue to increase by €10 million each time the maximum jackpot is won or rolls down, until it reaches €250 million.

When Has the Jackpot Cap Been Reached?

The most recent jackpot cap of €220 million was reached in October 2021 and, as a result, has now increased to €230 million. The previous cap of €220 million was reached less than a year earlier, in February 2021. Before changes were made to the Jackpot Cap mechanism in February 2020, the cap that had remained in place for a number of years stood at €190 million. This cap was reached four times. Prior to January 2012, the jackpot cap was set at €185 million and that cap was reached just once.

October 2021

The EuroMillions jackpot hit its new limit of €220 million for the draw on Friday 12th October. The grand prize was initially boosted to €130 million for the Superdraw on 24th September, however a series of rollovers after that brought it to reach its new capped amount, just eight months after it broke its previous record.

The jackpot was not won in its first draw at the cap this time around, however its second outing on 15th October proved to be the money maker for one lucky ticket holder in France. No details have yet been released about the winner. Should any information be released, it will be entirely at the discretion of the winner once they have claimed their prize.

February 2021

The jackpot hit its €210 million cap ahead of the draw on 23rd February. The top prize grew quickly following a Superdraw on 5th February, going past €200 million for the first time on 19th February and then triggering the cap in the next draw.

The jackpot remained at its limit until it was won by a ticket purchased in Switzerland for the draw on Fridy 26th February. The ticket holder was from German-speaking Switzerland and bought two tickets online at a cost of 7 Swiss francs.

December 2020

After a €130 million Superdraw on 20th November which was not won, the EuroMillions jackpot rolled over for the subsequent five draws. After the third rollover, it reached the cap of €200 million (as it was at the time). The jackpot remained at €200 million for the following two draws, when it was finally won by a French ticket holder on 11th December. As a result of the cap being reached, it then increased to €210 million for the next time it gets hit.

September 2019

The jackpot rolled over for 18 draws in a row to hit the €190 million cap ahead of the draw on Tuesday 24th September. It was the most consecutive draws without a jackpot winner in EuroMillions history. The top prize for the previous draw on Friday 20th September had fallen just short of the maximum amount, coming in at €188 million. The jackpot was not won until 8th October, when a Must Be Won draw took place and one anonymous UK ticket holder matched all the numbers to win the entire amount.

October 2017

The €190 million cap was also reached in October 2017. The limit was first reached in the draw on Tuesday 3rd October, but it went one more draw before being won by a player from Spain. The lucky winner remained anonymous but it was revealed that the ticket was bought in Las Palmas in Gran Canaria.

October 2014

On 24th October 2014, the EuroMillions jackpot hit the €190 million cap for the second time. The entire amount went to an anonymous ticket holder in Portugal.

August 2012

The first time the jackpot reached the €190 million cap was on Tuesday 7th August 2012. No one won the prize in that draw but it was won in the next one on Friday 10th August by Adrian and Gillian Bayford from Suffolk in the UK. The sterling value of the jackpot at the time was £148.6 million.

July 2011

The previous jackpot cap of €185 million was reached for the first and only time on Friday 8th July 2011. It then went one more draw before it was won by Colin and Chris Weir from Scotland. Their jackpot worked out at £161 million, making it the biggest lottery jackpot ever won in the UK.

November 2006

When EuroMillions first began, the jackpot could only roll over for a maximum of 11 draws before it had to be given away – regardless of how much it was worth. The second and last time this happened was on Friday 17th November 2006. On that occasion no one matched all the numbers to win the jackpot, so the prize money was shared between 20 ticket holders who matched five numbers plus one Lucky Star. Each winner took home a prize of £6,750,278.40 / €9,652,340.00.

February 2006

The first time the 11-rollover limit was reached was on Friday 3rd February 2006, when three ticket holders matched all the numbers to win €61 million each. Two of the winning tickets were purchased in France and one in Portugal.

History of the Jackpot Cap

Take a look at the various changes that have been made to the Jackpot Cap over the years since EuroMillions launched:

February 2004: EuroMillions Launches with 11-Rollover Limit

When EuroMillions was launched in 2004, the game was initially limited to a maximum of 11 consecutive rollovers, with no cap on the jackpot prize fund. If no player successfully matched all five main numbers and two Lucky Stars to win the top prize in the 12th draw, the money would roll down to be distributed to the next prize tier with winning players.

November 2009: Jackpot Cap Set At €185 Million

In November 2009, the rollover rule was changed and replaced with a maximum jackpot limit (known as a jackpot cap), which was set at €185 million. However, the new rules confirmed that once the jackpot reached this figure for the first time, the cap would then increase by another €5 million.

January 2012: Jackpot Cap Increased to €190 Million After Big Win

The jackpot cap of €185 million was eventually reached on 12th July 2011 when Scottish couple Chris and Colin Weir successfully scooped the jackpot - the cap was duly increased to €190 million. On 12th January 2012 the rules changed to permanently cap the jackpot at €190 million.

September 2016: Rolldowns Included in Big Changes to EuroMillions

In September 2016, a number of rule changes were introduced in order to generate bigger jackpots on a more regular basis. One of these changes was to increase the number of draws in which the jackpot could remain at €190 million before rolling down and being shared between ticket holders in a lower prize tier. Originally, the prize total could reach its limit and remain active for one draw before rolling down in the second draw; however, these changes saw the limit increased to four draws.

February 2020: Jackpot Cap Increased as Prizes are Changed

The EuroMillions prize structure was changed in February 2020 so that a larger percentage of the prize fund went to the jackpot in every draw. To help offer even more big prizes, the jackpot cap went up from €190 million to €200 million. Under the new rules, the jackpot cap would increase by €10 million every time it was won or rolled down, up to a maximum of €250 million.

Could the Jackpot Cap Change?

The UK EuroMillions game procedures contain a clause that allows it to be raised or lowered in the future, stating "Camelot and the EuroMillions Partners can change the level of the jackpot cap at any time".