Your Big Rollover EuroMillions Questions Answered

Your Big Rollover EuroMillions Questions Answered

EuroMillions rolled over on Friday 16th February, boosting the jackpot to a magnificent £141 million (€160 million) for Tuesday night. No player has matched all five main numbers and both Lucky Stars since the start of 2018, leading to the game’s biggest jackpot since Friday 6th October 2017, when a Spanish ticket holder won £170.8 million (€190 million).

With the prize pool so high, you might have some unanswered questions about EuroMillions, so take a look at this page for everything you need to know ahead of Tuesday night’s draw.

How Did the Jackpot Get so High?

Friday’s winning EuroMillions numbers were 10, 12, 23, 32 and 50 with Lucky Stars 4 and 10, but there was no jackpot winner. You can find the full prize breakdown for the draw on the Results page. It was the 14th rollover in a row, the longest winless run for almost a year.

In every draw, the jackpot fund receives a portion of the money taken in ticket sales, which is added to in the following draw if no one wins. For the first six rollovers, 43.2 percent goes to boosting the top prize, with 27 percent allocated to that tier for every subsequent draw without a winner.

As the jackpot grows and more people are tempted to play, that 27 percent becomes worth much more in each subsequent draw, meaning the jackpot continues to grow quickly.

Is the Jackpot Capped?

EuroMillions has a jackpot cap of €190 million, after which it can stay at that level for five draws before it must be won. If there is no top-tier winner, the full prize rolls down to the next tier with winners. Find out more about the EuroMillions prize limit in this recent Euro-Millions.com news story.

Will I Pay Tax on a EuroMillions Jackpot?

Only three participating nations tax EuroMillions prizes.

- Spain has a 20 percent tax rate on prizes of more than €2,500

- Portugal takes 20 percent on prize values over €5,000.

- Switzerland withholds 35 percent on amounts worth more than CHF1,000.

However, you may have to pay tax on the interest you earn from EuroMillions prizes in any of the other EuroMillions countries. In addition, if you choose your numbers online from outside of the nine EuroMillions nations, you should check your local laws before you play to find out what you might owe.

Is it More Difficult to Win When More People Play?

Some players think that you are less likely to win the EuroMillions jackpot when more people play the game, but this is not the case. For the main EuroMillions draw, you are playing against the number matrix of the draw, not the other ticket holders. Your chances of winning the jackpot remain the same no matter how many others get involved.

However, it is true that the number of players affects your chances in the raffle games that many countries offer in addition to EuroMillions. For example, Millionaire Maker in the UK, France’s My Million and Portuguese M1lhao all guarantee a set number of winners from everyone who plays a EuroMillions line in that country. This is why your best chance of winning a raffle draw is in the less popular Tuesday draw, when the jackpot is low.

Can I Stay Anonymous With a EuroMillions Win?

Although there are arguments both for and against staying private when you win a huge EuroMillions jackpot, each of the nine participating countries allows their citizens this option. Three of the five biggest EuroMillions winners of all time, from Spain, Portugal and France, all opted for anonymity, whilst the sixth biggest winner, a player from Belgium, revealed a number of details about himself but not his name.

How Can I Buy EuroMillions Tickets?

For a shot at Tuesday’s £141 million EuroMillions jackpot, you can buy tickets at retailers in each of the nine nations. Alternatively, pick your numbers online and you will be emailed and urged to check your player account if you win a prize.

Written by



Published:
Last Updated: Thursday, 5 April 2018 13:53:51+00:00
Published By Euro-Millions.com